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through. it was not a matter of their qualifications so much as the environment in which they were placed, which is not of their doing. their chain of command did not of of going through all of the level steps. they went to the wing commander. that is not something they did, that was something externally placed. that is my concern. the people in the periphery that want to see certain amounts, certain numbers of women in certain jobs, they may or may not be qualified. if they are not, they should not be in the job. i am concerned that somebody will say, they have to be in the job because our program, the inclusion of women demands it. then you start eroding or chipping away at the qualification issue. that, to be quite honest, is my biggest concern. not with the women can do. not what they are qualified to do. what people outside of the program thing should be done. host: i want to make sure i understand. when these women first came through as a pilot trainees, they had a different chain of command than their male trainee counterplots? caller: it was not anything written down on paper. if
environment? we will ask national journal reporter coral davenport. we will be right back. >> ♪ ♪ [video clip] >> we have created a platform that we call a digital feedback system. a main component of the platform are an integral sensors that turns on when it's all it-- when you swallow it. it collects information about the medicines that you take and your heart rate and body rate and temperature. a wellness matrix. then it communicates via radio with a cell phone that you carry. they process the data and send it back to you as an application that can help you manage your health. >> we are at a point where we have had all these incremental and amazing changes over the last five years. now we are poised to really make some great leaps in complex diseases. our understanding of cancer in the last five years has forced the last 25. the next 10 years will really take us through some amazing advances. >> the latest advances in health technology from the international consumer electronics show. tonight at 8:00 eastern on c- span2. >> want can count the times that americans say we are the best countr
. certainly they were. but he was in a crisis environment from the moment he stepped in. his approach was to enact the biggest tax increase in the country and the biggest in connecticut history. at the same time he was doing that he was making budget cuts. there was a real flight with public employee unions in canada as a kid. -- a real fight with public employee unions in connecticut. he really had some hard choices to make over the last couple of years. connecticut stands out. host: here is a recent story from "usa today," -- let us talk about the mandates states have to balance their budgets. here is from. how significant is that? guest: the wasted governments -- it is very significant. state governments could not say that we would put these bills on. they have ways around balanced budget requirement. there are ways to make the budget look balanced on paper without being really balance. they cannot act in a countercyclical way, spend money when things did bad. they tend to cut money when things did that in the economy. then it drags itself on the economy. that is why you have the f
to that environment. i have to believe that the more we can treat people equally, the more likely they are to treat each other equally. host: from yesterday's news conference at the pentagon, and our entire programming is on c- -- we welcome our radio listeners as well. there was this from robert -- this was based on the clip we just showed you, from the army officer from the marine corps. we will go to robert from north carolina, a democrat. caller: i am a combat veteran of korea and vietnam. i will cut it short. they were talking about the all volunteer army. there were trying to get women into the ranks. my sister -- [indiscernible] one thing i found out, what we went through in vietnam and korea, it was for men and went -- and men only. yes, they served in different areas such as the medical field, but in combat, no. host: ok, thank you for the call. the story inside the new york times -- there are similar stories around the country. -- a couple of points -- back to your calls. jesse in muskegon, michigan. good morning. caller: good morning. can you hear me? host: yes. caller: i have a
on principles but also have civility and i think we can do a little bit to improve the environment. host: sasha on twitter is advocating for more specifics when you talk about earmarks for your district. is it hard as an incoming freshman to take the lumps of what it means to cut spending for your constituents? guest: cutting my own budget by 10% is a significant reduction, and beyond that we have reached a point as a nation where there will be no sacred cows. the pledge we made as a house republican team is that our budget will balance in 10 years and now paul ryan budget of just last year had a lot of praise, and rightfully so because it was the only show in town, but it balance in about 20 years. that is a remarkable difference. you will see means testing of social security and medicare, probably benefit reductions that would apply to folks closer to 60 in age and a specific plan of proposals that we will roll out in the budget committee over the next couple of months. listen, we are not quick -- kidding. we have to stop spending meet -- money we do not have as a nation. host: commerce and l
of the political parties. i worry about the environment and all kinds of things, but the reality -- reliability of the u.s. debt, not at all. i am worried about the social and political stability of the world. a large part of europe that is depressioneriencing great levels of unemployment. and how long can we sustain u stable democratic system when 60 percent of the young people are out of work? that is the concern in europe right now. host: the twitter question touches on this. also, are there any models in europe that are succeeding? guest: if you look at sweden has handled this very well. the excess of welfare state is the problem. the biggest welfare state in the world and has driven through the crisis beautifully. my favorite, the little economy that could, iceland. they were supposed to turn into a smoking whole, but they broke their rules. they did not bail out the bankers. they were willing to let the currency to value. they were willing to let there be controls. it has a lower and a plumber rate than we do right now. -- unemployment rate than we do right now. britain is interesting. wh
? it is a fantastic place to be. i'm at the intersection of public policy and advanced technology for environment and safety. if it is a fantastic deal to be in now. it is the wave of the future. advanced vehicles, and advanced technologies. we work with the government on regulatory issues, collect a lot of information on the future of energy, where it's headed in the u.s. and globally. and we tried to use the information to help steer toyota's advanced development. guest: one of the high points is greenhouse gases and fuel economy for our vehicles. the auto industry has signed up for some fairly aggressive standards that will take us to the 2025 model year. they are aggressive standards. consumers will have to embrace the technologies we're trying to get out there. host: what does that really mean? guest: the target is 54 miles per hour by 2025. we have a lot of work to do. our strategy is are hybrid strategy. toyota had 16% of our new vehicle fleet were hybrid vehicles. the industry itself is that 3%. we intend to maintain that leadership. host: that means you have to do with the future of what
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7